Minimum Wage

On July 21, 2021, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) announced that a wide range of government contractors would be required to pay private sector employees at least $15 per hour, in a plan to carry out President Joe Biden’s executive order signed this past April.  Our blog post about President Biden’s executive order requiring

On June 21, 2021, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced that it will propose new regulations limiting the amount of time that tipped employees, like food servers or bartenders, can perform on non-tipped work before they would be owed a full minimum wage from their employer.  The public will have until August 23, 2021

On Tuesday, April 27, President Biden signed an executive order requiring federal contractors to pay their employees a minimum of $15 an hour starting on March 30, 2022. After that, the order will continue to index the minimum wage for federal contractors to an inflation measure.

This raise in the pay floor – which was

On Tuesday, the Department of Labor (DOL) announced that it had issued two Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) concerning tipped workers’ compensation. If adopted, the NPRM would delay, for a second time, the effective date of several rules the agency published during the Trump Administration. Though for now the move is merely a delay, it

On January 26, 2021, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) suspended the Final Rule on tipped employees that it had issued on December 22, 2020. The Final Rule would have clarified tip-pooling for employees in the food service and hospitality industry, as well as how the tip credit applied to employees who perform both tipped

The DOL abruptly ended the Payroll Audit Independent Determination (PAID) program on January 29, 2021.  The program, which was adopted during the Trump administration, allowed employers to self-report FLSA violations before a complaint, pay back pay and avoid liquidated damages, penalties or fines.  Employees were prohibited from bringing private actions to recover additional damages for

The DOL issued an opinion letter on January 19, 2021, finding a wider group of journalists and media personnel qualify for the creative professional exemption under the FLSA.  Traditionally, the DOL and courts found that exemptions under the FLSA should be narrowly construed.  In 2018, the United States Supreme Court upended that standard, finding that