Labor and Employment

On April 1, 2024, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) published its final rule – known informally as the “walk around rule” – which makes two changes to its Representatives of Employers and Employees regulation (29 C.F.R. § 1903.8(c)) to significantly expand who an employee can bring in to join a workplace safety inspection.… Continue Reading

On Monday, February 5, a Regional Director of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a ruling that Dartmouth College basketball players are employees of the school, allowing them to vote on unionizing. The NLRB’s Boston Regional Director, Laura Sacks, issued her opinion after all 15 members of the Dartmouth men’s basketball team signed a petition on September 13, 2023 to be represented by the Service Employees International Union, Local 560, a union which already represents some of the school’s employees.… Continue Reading

As part of a final rule published on July 25, 2023, and in connection with its newly published Form I-9 (which employees may use after August 1), certain employers will be able to permanently verify an employee’s employment eligibility remotely. This final rule continues the pandemic-related flexibility offered to employers to meet their Form I-9 verification requirements.… Continue Reading

The U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recently updated its technical assistance bulletin and comprehensive COVID-19 resource, titled What You Should Know About COVID-19 and the ADA, the Rehabilitation Act, and Other EEO Laws (available here), calling the additions its “capstone” to the bulletin in light of the recent end to the COVID-19 public health emergency.… Continue Reading

Minnesota Governor Tim Walz has signed into law three bills that create new obligations for Minnesota employers.

First, on May 24, 2023, Governor Walz signed a labor appropriations bill prohibiting the use of covenants not to compete against Minnesota employees and employers, with very limited exceptions involving the sale or dissolution of a business.… Continue Reading

Minnesota employers have 43 days to consider whether they want to beat the clock and enact or update non-compete agreements before July 1, 2023.

This week, the Minnesota legislature passed a labor appropriations bill which, if signed by Governor Walz as expected, will significantly restrict the use of non-compete clauses in employment and independent contractor agreements, as well as nearly any agreement entered into by a Minnesota party.… Continue Reading

By Brian D. Pedrow and Shannon N. Attalla

On May 1, in its Lion Elastomers decision, the Board overruled Trump-era precedent (General Motors) that made it easier for employers to discipline workers for outbursts in the context of workplace activism and union-related activity.  The Board reinstated prior precedent (Atlantic Steel and its progeny) that provides more leeway for worker outbursts when engaging in activities protected under the National Labor Relations Act, reasoning that this context is different from ordinary workplace exchanges. … Continue Reading

The United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and three other federal agencies issued a joint statement vowing to use existing laws to protect employees and the general public from discrimination and bias arising from the use of artificial intelligence (AI).  The agencies joining the EEOC in the April 25, 2023, statement include the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division (Division), and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).  … Continue Reading

The focus remains on the National Labor Relations Board’s (Board or NLRB) ruling in February that asking employees to sign separation agreements with confidentiality and non-disparagement clauses is unlawful.  Most recently, the Board urged the Sixth Circuit to enforce its February 21, 2023 decision in McLaren Macomb and Local 40 RN Staff Council, Office and Professional Employees, International Union (OPEIU), AFL-CIO, which found that the company had violated Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) when it offered a separation agreement to 11 furloughed bargaining members that included a broad non-disparagement provision and a provision treating the agreement as confidential. … Continue Reading

Last month, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ruled that an employer violates Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA or Act) when the employer offers employee severance agreements with provisions restricting employees’ Section 7 rights under the Act, such as with overly broad confidentiality and non-disparagement provisions.  McLaren Macomb, 372 NLRB No.… Continue Reading