Biden Administration

On July 9, 2021, the White House issued an executive order (“EO”) with the stated objective of countering anti-competitive forces throughout the economy.  One specific directive is the limitation of non-compete agreements, which include not only restrictive covenants, but also “other clauses or agreements that may unfairly limit worker mobility.”  Potentially, this could include customer

On June 24, 2021, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to overturn a formal rule that imposed heightened information sharing requirements on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) during the EEOC’s conciliation process.  The Senate has already voted to repeal the rule.  The bill will now be sent to President Biden, who is expected to

June is Pride Month and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has issued timely guidance on the protections extended to LGBTQIA+ workers under Title VII.

In June 2020, the Supreme Court determined that Title VII’s prohibition against discrimination based on sex extended to sexual orientation and gender identity.  Bostock v. Clayton County was a landmark case

As previously reported here, under the American Rescue Plan Act, certain employers have until May 31, 2021 to notify eligible individuals of their potential right to subsidized COBRA coverage. Eligible individuals are those who lost group health plan coverage due to a reduction of hours or an involuntary termination of employment and who are

Employers with employee health plans subject to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) should take note that, earlier this week, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced that its Office for Civil Rights (OCR) will begin enforcing Section 1557 of ACA to prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Section 1557

On May 6, 2021, the Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued a final rule, effective immediately, withdrawing a pro-business independent contractor rule that would have made it easier for businesses to classify workers as independent contractors, rather than as employees who are entitled to minimum wage and overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act.  Earlier

On Tuesday, April 27, President Biden signed an executive order requiring federal contractors to pay their employees a minimum of $15 an hour starting on March 30, 2022. After that, the order will continue to index the minimum wage for federal contractors to an inflation measure.

This raise in the pay floor – which was

On April 26, 2021, President Biden signed an executive order establishing the “White House Task Force on Worker Organizing and Empowerment” (the “Task Force”), which will be dedicated to mobilizing the federal government’s policies, programs, and practices to empower workers to organize and successfully bargain with their employers.

The Task Force will be chaired by

The United States Department of Labor (DOL) Wage and Hour Division just launched a new initiative called “Essential Workers, Essential Protections” that provides workers with information about the wage and hour laws that apply to them, including instructions on how to contact the DOL with questions or complaints.

In conjunction with this new initiative, the

On Tuesday, the Department of Labor (DOL) announced that it had issued two Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) concerning tipped workers’ compensation. If adopted, the NPRM would delay, for a second time, the effective date of several rules the agency published during the Trump Administration. Though for now the move is merely a delay, it