Denise M. Keyser

Since March 2020, the federal Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has permitted employers the flexibility to engage in remote review of certain new employees’ proof of their identity and authorization to work in the United States. At the end of July 2023, those flexibility rules will sunset – although businesses will have until the end of August to fully comply. … Continue Reading

On February 6, 2023, Governor Phil Murphy signed into law a controversial bill that will provide sweeping new protections and an expansion of rights for temporary workers in New Jersey, dubbed the “Temporary Workers’ Bill of Rights” (A1474/S511).  This new law, which represents a significant victory for temporary workers in the Garden State, seeks to increase government oversight of temporary staffing agencies, advance pay equity between temporary workers and regular employees, and preclude retaliatory conduct against temporary workers. … Continue Reading

On January 30, 2023, the Biden Administration said that it will end COVID-19 emergency declarations on May 11, 2023.  The federal government has been paying for COVID-19 vaccines, some tests, and certain treatments under the public health emergency declaration. Many of those costs now will be transferred to private insurance and government health plans.… Continue Reading

In January 2020, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed into law Senate Bill 3170, which amended and significantly expanded employer obligations under the Millville Dallas Airmotive Plant Job Loss Notification Act (“NJ WARN”).  In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, the State delayed the amendments’ effective date until 90 days after the termination of the Governor’s Declaration of a State of Emergency related to COVID-19. … Continue Reading

Part two of our “Back to School” webinar series will take a look at looming issues for employers as they face an uncertain economic forecast while still dealing with novel challenges created by the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite unemployment rates remaining steady, a changing economy has many employers anticipating the need to reduce their workforce and re-thinking workforce management.… Continue Reading

As COVID lingers and the economy remains uncertain, employers face a host of issues. Recently, a group of Ballard Spahr attorneys hosted part one of a two part webinar series to revisit the basics, as well as novel issues, related to aligning your workforce to your business needs. Many businesses do not have enough workers and are focused on attracting and retaining necessary talent, while others, due to rising costs and stubborn supply chain problems, must consider layoffs and reductions in force.… Continue Reading

Earlier this week, New Jersey state senators tabled the vote on Bill S511, landmark legislation dubbed the NJ temporary worker “Bill of Rights.” Governor Phil Murphy conditionally vetoed the proposed legislation last month, and advocates expected the bill to pass following the state Assembly’s approval of Gov. Murphy’s revisions. But ultimately, state senators pulled the bill due to insufficient support to pass the revised version, leaving employers with the current state of flexibility to work with temporary agencies to fill gaps in their workforce.… Continue Reading

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has issued proposed regulations under the nondiscrimination provisions of Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The proposed rules restore and augment a number of the nondiscrimination requirements in regulations that were published in 2016, but later stripped away in rules published in 2020.… Continue Reading

Originally published in June of last year, and as reported by Ballard Spahr here, the OSHA Healthcare Emergency Temporary Standard (“ETS”) set safety requirements for health care and health care support service workers in settings where people with COVID-19 are reasonably expected to be present. The ETS expired after six months, on December 21, 2021.… Continue Reading

This week, in Hughes et al. v. Northwestern University et al., the U.S. Supreme Court held that the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) imposes a duty of prudence on fiduciaries that includes a continuing duty to monitor investments and remove imprudent investments in a reasonable time. The defined contribution plans at issue each allowed participants to choose their individual investment mix from a menu of options selected by the plan administrators.… Continue Reading