Denise M. Keyser

On Monday, February 5, a Regional Director of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a ruling that Dartmouth College basketball players are employees of the school, allowing them to vote on unionizing. The NLRB’s Boston Regional Director, Laura Sacks, issued her opinion after all 15 members of the Dartmouth men’s basketball team signed a petition on September 13, 2023 to be represented by the Service Employees International Union, Local 560, a union which already represents some of the school’s employees.… Continue Reading

On January 9, 2024, the US Department of Labor (DOL) issued a final rule that provides revised guidance on whether a worker is properly classified as an employee or independent contractor under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Under the FLSA, employees are entitled to minimum wage and overtime pay, while independent contractors are not.… Continue Reading

On August 8, 2023, the U. S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued a final rule revamping its procedures for determining prevailing wages under the Davis-Bacon and Related Acts (collectively, DBRA). This is the first time in forty years that DOL has revisited this process.

The DBRA requires payment of locally prevailing wages and fringe benefits for various classifications of workers on most federally funded or assisted contracts for the construction, alteration, or repair of public buildings or public works.… Continue Reading

By December 31, 2023, health plans and insurers must submit an attestation of compliance with the “anti-gag rules” of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (CAA).  The rules apply to all agreements entered into on or after the date that the CAA was enacted (December 27, 2020), and the first attestation applies retroactively to that date.… Continue Reading

Last week, amid its headline-generating decisions on affirmative action, religious accommodations in the workplace, and LGBTQ rights, the Supreme Court of the United States also issued its decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway Co., 600 U.S. _____ (2023) (slip op.), a decision which has the potential to expand a state’s jurisdiction over out-of-state corporations registered to do business there. … Continue Reading

On June 29, 2023, the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) issued a unanimous opinion, authored by Justice Alito, in Groff v. DeJoy, Postmaster General, 600 U.S. ___ (2023), in which it “clarified” decades-old precedent regarding an employer’s obligation to accommodate the religious beliefs of its employees. The unanimous Court held that, under Title VII, an employer is required to accommodate an employee’s religious beliefs unless doing so would result in substantial increased costs in relation to the conduct of its particular business.… Continue Reading

Last week, the National Labor Relations Board (“Board”) issued a decision changing the legal standard it will use to determine whether workers are “employees” covered by the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”), or independent contractors who are not.

Prior to 2019, the Board’s test for determining whether a worker was a statutory employee or independent contractor weighed a variety of factors, including those outlined in the Restatement (Second) of Agency:

(a) the extent of control which, by the agreement, the employer may exercise over the details of the work;

(b) whether or not the one employed is engaged in a distinct occupation or business;

(c) the kind of occupation, with reference to whether, in the locality, the work is usually done under the direction of the employer or by a specialist without supervision;

d) the skill required in the particular occupation;

e) whether the employer or the worker supplies the instrumentalities, tools, and the place of work for the person doing the work;

(f) the length of time for which the person is employed;

(g) the method of payment, whether by the time or by the job;

(h) whether or not the work is a part of the regular business of the employer;

(i) whether or not the parties believe they are creating the relation of employer and employee; and

(j) whether the principal is or is not in business.… Continue Reading

Since March 2020, the federal Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has permitted employers the flexibility to engage in remote review of certain new employees’ proof of their identity and authorization to work in the United States. At the end of July 2023, those flexibility rules will sunset – although businesses will have until the end of August to fully comply. … Continue Reading

On February 6, 2023, Governor Phil Murphy signed into law a controversial bill that will provide sweeping new protections and an expansion of rights for temporary workers in New Jersey, dubbed the “Temporary Workers’ Bill of Rights” (A1474/S511).  This new law, which represents a significant victory for temporary workers in the Garden State, seeks to increase government oversight of temporary staffing agencies, advance pay equity between temporary workers and regular employees, and preclude retaliatory conduct against temporary workers. … Continue Reading

On January 30, 2023, the Biden Administration said that it will end COVID-19 emergency declarations on May 11, 2023.  The federal government has been paying for COVID-19 vaccines, some tests, and certain treatments under the public health emergency declaration. Many of those costs now will be transferred to private insurance and government health plans.… Continue Reading